Stop the ‘Internet’ presses! We mean ‘internet’

AP goes lowercase with internet

Over the weekend, the Associated Press announced some 250 additions to their 2016 AP Stylebook during the American Copy Editors Society’s national conference in Portland. Some updates are minor, and some are blowing up the Internet — well, at least in writer and editor circles online. If you have a digital subscription to apstylebook.com, you may have already noticed some of the updates as they’ve ...[Read More]

How to make your last name plural

how to make your last name plural holiday cards

It’s the most wonderful time of the year for sending holiday cards to friends, family and clients — and unfortunately one of the most embarrassing times to commit crimes against the misuse of apostrophes. Imagine the horror to realize — only after mailing paper cards or pressing “send” on your digital ones — that you mistakingly made your last name possessive. Since most people sign cards on behal ...[Read More]

25 words you may be saying incorrectly

25 words you may be saying incorrectly

“AM-blee-ance” “puhss-GEH-tee” “pee-buh-JEH-wee” These are pronunciations a toddler might use for “ambulance,” “spaghetti” and “peanut butter and jelly.” Ok, I’m talking about my toddler specifically — and yet, I know exactly what he’s referring to when he says these words. As we become more familiar with language, we learn phonics, spelling and eventually how to read — on paper and al ...[Read More]

Punctuation gets political

What is it about the number of spaces after periods, or the use or omission of the Oxford comma that can send people into an all-out political brawl? Let’s not even go there with the use of apostrophes or commas. Likely, we were taught one particular way to address each of these punctuation issues in a typing or computer class as impressionable young tikes. “That’s the way itR ...[Read More]

En vs. em vs. hyphens

En vs. em vs. hyphens

I’m talking about dashes — the under-utilized cousin of parentheses and commas — and their often confused, more distant relative, the hyphen. Hyphens (-) are the easiest to type quickly on your computer or mobile keyboard. They’re just one keystroke, no shortcuts, no searching through special character menus, and therefore often over-used when a dash might actually be needed. There is a long and s ...[Read More]

National Spelling Bee Week

National Spelling Bee Week

Would you like some “synonym rolls” with your coffee this morning? We love those funny sites that share spelling, emoticon or autocorrect fails (this particular image landed in our inbox from someecards.com). In honor of Scripps National Spelling Bee week, with finals today and tomorrow airing live on ESPN, we thought you might enjoy this online spelling quiz with real questions from 2 ...[Read More]

Why you need a style guide

Why you need a style guide

What exactly is a style guide, and how can your company’s communication efforts benefit from creating and implementing one? A style guide is a set of writing and design standards that should be applied to create a cohesive look and feel among all written communications for a particular company, brand or industry. Style guides, sometimes referred to as branding and style guides or manuals, can be p ...[Read More]

One space between sentences, please

One space between sentences, please

This message is for you if you’re still putting two spaces between sentences. Consider this an intervention. We love you, but the time has come to move on. I understand that your high school typing teacher told you to ALWAYS put two spaces after a period and between sentences, but those days are long gone. The time has come to put one and only one space between each sentence — and this is a ...[Read More]

Those four spelling rules you meant to remember

Those four spelling rules you meant to remember

1. i before e, except after c or when sounded like “ay,” as in neighbor and weigh. Exceptions: weird, foreign, height, leisure, protein and either and words with “cien,” including ancient, efficient and science are also exceptions. 2. When two vowels go a’walking, the first one does the talking. When two vowels are together in a word, the first usually has a long sound and the second is silent. Fo ...[Read More]